Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment in 2015

Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment in 2015


According to UNEP's 10th report "Global Trends in Renewable Energy Investment 2016", prepared by the Frankfurt School-UNEP Collaborating Centre for Climate & Sustainable Energy Finance and Bloomberg New Energy Finance, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) and Bloomberg New Energy Finance all investments in renewables reached nearly $286 billion in 2015, more than six times more than in 2004. For the first time, more than half of all added power generation capacity came from renewable sources. These record figures in this report demonstrate a solid trend towards increasing investment and capacity.

According to the report, last year saw global investment in renewables rise 5% to $285.9 billion, taking it above the previous record of $278.5 billion reached in 2011.


Source: UNEP, Bloomberg New Energy Finance


As stated in the report, renewable energy excluding large hydro made up 53.6% of the new power generating capacity installed in 2015, the first time it has ever represented the majority of additions. Also for the first time developing economies get over developed countries in terms of total new renewable energy.

China was by far the largest investing country for renewables (excluding large hydro). Together with India and Brazil, “the big-three” the investment rise a 16% from 2014 ($120.2 billion), while other developing economies increase investments in 30% ($31.6 billion).

The report also indicates that there are three new markets completing the top 10 investors: South Africa up 329% to $4.5 billion, Mexico doubling to 4$ billion, and Chile rising 151% to $3.4 billions


Source: UNEP, Bloomberg New Energy Finance


Renewables also attracted more than double the 130 billion committed to new coal- and gas-fired power stations in 2015, despite exchange rate shifts that depressed the dollar value of investments in other currency zones, and despite sharp falls in oil, coal and gas prices that protected the competitive position of fossil fuel generation.

Even sustainable and renewable energy is growing, is not quickly enough to meet expected energy demand. According to Ban Ki-moon Secretary-General of the United Nations, to be consistent with the goal of zero net greenhouse gas, will be necessary to reduce or leave fossil-fuel power plant capacity.


Click here to read the full report